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Weight Loss Management

What’s Your Ideal Body Weight?

What’s Your Ideal Body Weight?

 

 

ideal body weightAccording to Gallup Poll’s annual Health and Healthcare Survey given in 2011, the average US adult’s ‘ideal weight’ has shifted upward.  Personal ideal weight estimates have increased by about 10-20 pounds since 1990. It seems that as our actual weight drifts upward, so does our perception of what our ‘ideal’ weight would be.   

Americans' self-professed "ideal" selves have put on weight. Women on average said their ideal weight should be 138 pounds -- up from 129 reported in 1991. Men on average said their ideal weight should be 196 pounds -- up from the 180 that they reported in 1991.

After reporting their actual weights, it turns out that men on average were 15 pounds over their reported ideal weight and women were 22 pounds heavier than their reported ideal.

Your Ideal Body Weight

In case we are somewhat in the dark about what our ideal weights should actually be, there is an easy way to calculate your ideal body weight.  Because of different body types and small, medium, and large frames, it’s not beneficial to aim for a specific number on the scale, but rather a target range.

Physicians like to use (body mass index) BMI in order categorize people based upon their weight and height, but few of us are going to sit down and calculate our BMI’s as we lose weight.  We see a number on the scale, indicating our actual weight. So instead the calculations below give you the same height-to-weight-ratios, but in numbers you can understand. Keep in mind, these ideal weights do not hold true for athletes, as they carry a lot more weight in lean muscle tissue.

See the Ideal Body Weight Calculator to skip the calculations and view your personalized body weight instantly.

Here are the ranges of ideal body weights based upon height for adults.


Women

1.       The first step is to see how many inches over 5 feet you are.  For women who are less than 5 feet tall, you will want to calculate the number of inches under 5 feet you are.

2.       Take your number and multiply it by 5.

3.       Then add 105 to get your ideal weight.  For women less than 5 feet, subtract this from 105 to get your ideal weight.

4.       Then take 10% above that and 10% below that to create your ideal weight range.

(Height difference from 5 feet)  x 5+ 105 = ideal weight in pounds

For example, a 5’6” woman, her ideal weight would be   6” x 5 = 30, and then + 105 = 135 lbs.

Because we are not all built the same, there is a range surround your ideal body weight, which is plus or minus 10%.   So the ideal body weight for that woman would be 135lbs, and the ideal range for that woman would be 122 to 149 lbs.

For a 4’10” woman, her ideal weight would be 2 inches x 5 = 10.  105-10 = 95 lbs.  Her ideal body weight range would be 86 to 105.


Men

1.       The first step is to see how many inches over 5 feet you are.  For men who are less than 5 feet tall, you will want to calculate the number of inches under 5 feet you are.

2.        Take your number and multiply it by 6.

3.       Then add 106 to get your ideal weight.  For men less than 5 feet, subtract this from 106 to get your ideal weight.

4.       Then take 10% above that and 10% below that to create your ideal weight range.

For example, for a 6’0” tall man, his ideal weight would be 12” x 6 = 72, and then + 106 = 178 lbs, plus or minus 10%. So the ideal body weight range for that man would be 160 to 196.


These calculations are based upon the Devine (1974) and Robinson (1983) formulas for calculating a healthy body weight.

See the Ideal Body Weight Calculator to view your personalized ideal body weight calculation.

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